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Posts Tagged ‘SITE’


E-learning 2.0 differs from traditional e-learning.  Instead of learners simply receiving, reading, and responding to learning content in traditional e-learning, e-learning 2.0 allows learners to create content and to collaborate with peers to form a learning network with distribution of content creation and responsibilities.  In addition, e-learning 2.0 allows learners to easily access content through search, aggregation, and tagging.  It provides learners with opportunities to interact with the content and share their thoughts and comments with not only the instructor but also with other learners.  E-learning 2.0, therefore, is evolving to one of the most exciting, dynamic, and challenging fields involving teaching and learning online.

I delivered a presentation entitled “Developing an Online Course Based on E-Learning 2.0 Concepts” at the 2010 SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) International Conference in San Diego on March 31, 2010.  The following presentation shows my current effort of designing, developing, and implementing a graduate course in the blended learning format at my university.  Besides including the common components of an online/hybrid course offered by traditional LMS such as Blackboard, the e-learning 2.0 components (blog, podcasts, social networking site, and Wiki) are created and integrated into the course.  Though the teaching of this hybrid course based on e-learning 2.0 concepts is still in process and data collection is under way, the feedbacks from students so far are very positive and encouraging.   I think the e-learning 2.0 instructional approach allows the instructor to empower learners and create exciting new learning opportunities.  It allows students to easily access course content, interact content with others, construct new knowledge, and collaborate with others to form a learning network.  Students can communicate with others and access knowledge in ways that encourage creative and reflective practices that extend beyond traditional online learning.

Please stay tuned and follow my blog.  I should complete the data collection and data analysis after the summer.  Then, I will be happy to share the results of my study regarding students’ feedback on their attitudes and the effectiveness of the e-learning 2.0 instructional approach.

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The phenomenon growth of social networking services/sites (SNSs) in recent years speaks to one of the defining features of Web 2.0 – the social web.  Today, social networking is very popular and digital native students already found social networking services integral to their daily life.  Many recent studies including my previous study indicate that social networking could be used in education to enhance students’ learning experiences and promote classroom communities of practice.

Approximately a year ago, Dr. Hsiu-Ting Hung and I conducted an exploratory study on the use of social networking technology to facilitate teaching and learning in the college classroom.  Our study set out to examine three regularly-scheduled courses at two public universities in Taiwan. Adopting the situated learning theory as the conceptual framework, our study attempted to answer two research questions: (1) What are students’ experiences with and views on the use of social networking sites in the courses under investigation? (2) What is the impact of using social networking sites to supplement face-to-face courses on students’ perceived sense of classroom community?

The findings of this study were presented at the 2010 SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) International Conference in San Diego last week.   Overall, the results indicated that the majority of the students held positive attitudes towards the use of class social networks as a means to strengthen their connectedness among class members. Social networking in the observed classrooms was found helpful for promoting classroom communities of practice.  For more information about our study, please view the presentation shown below.  We welcome comments and suggestions.  Thanks.

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