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Today, over 3,000 of the Web 2.0 applications and services are available on the Web and many of them have great potentials in teaching and learning. The image link shown below was a presentation I delivered at the 2011 TxDLA 14th Conference in San Antonio two weeks ago. This presentation offers a list of 15 of the best Web 2.0 applications for teachers. These Web 2.0 tools are free and valuable to teachers and students.

http://prezi.com/suoreasmdbh9/15-must-have-web-tools-for-teachers/

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Flubaroo is a free tool that helps you quickly grade multiple-choice or fill-in-blank assignments.     Besides grading, Flubaroo also calculates average assignment score, computes average score per question, and flags low-scoring questions, shows you a grade distribution graph, and gives you the option to email each student their grade, and an answer key.

In order to use Flubaroo, you must have a Google Docs or Gmail account.  I think Flubaroo is a useful tool for teachers to grade online assignment.  It helps teachers get reporting and analysis on student performance as well as email scores to students.

 

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The advent of Web 2.0 technologies allows teachers to empower students and create exciting new learning opportunities. Students can use Web 2.0 tools to create, contribute, share, collaborate, connect, and participate in a global learning community. Already, many teachers took advantages of Web 2.0 technologies and implemented them into teaching and learning. However, many researchers have found that perceived usefulness, or the extent to which an individual believes that the use of technology will enhance performance, has a positive influence on behavioral intention.  Thus, studies of teachers’ perceptions and interests are critical because teachers’ perceptions are significant to the implementation of technology innovations in teaching and learning.

Yesterday, I gave a presentation on our recent research study at the 2011 Creating Futures Through Technology Conference in Biloxi, Mississippi.  In this presentation, my co-presenter, Patrivan Yuen and I discussed the findings of our study that examined Mississippi teachers’ perceptions, interests, and use of Web 2.0 tools in education.  The population of this study was Mississippi teachers at all levels.  Participants at the MECA and CFTTC conferences in 2010 were invited to participate in the study.  A total of 368 participants completed the questionnaire online.

You can view our Slideshare to learn more about our research study and its findings.  Also, please feel free to provide suggestions and comments.  Thanks.

 

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A survey report, “Instructors and Students: Technology Use, Engagement and Learning Outcomes,” was recently released by Cengage Learning.  The survey was conducted by research and consulting firm Eduventures and was administered to 751 students and 201 instructors across the United States in December 2010.  This is the second Cengage Learning/Eduventures survey designed to uncover how educational technology impacts overall student engagement and learning outcomes.

 

According to survey results, students and instructors do agree that educational technology can enhance engagement, which can lead to improved learning outcomes.

  • A majority (58 percent) of instructors believe that technology in courses positively impacts student engagement.
  • Seventy-one percent of instructors that rated student engagement levels as “high” report seeing a great benefit to learning outcomes as a result of using technology in courses.
  • Seventy-one percent of students who are employed full-time and seventy-seven percent of students who are employed part-time prefer more technology-based tools in the classroom.

In addition, students and instructors have seen technology improve engagement in the past 12 months.

  • 79 percent of instructors and 86 percent of students have seen the average level of engagement improve over the last year as they have increased their use of digital educational tools.
  • Additionally, 67 percent of students reported they preferred courses that use a great deal of technology, a nine percent increase from the previous year.
  • Similarly, 58 percent of instructors said they prefer teaching courses that use a great deal of technology, a 10 percent increase from 2009.

For more information on the results, read the press release or the complete survey results here.

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An interesting presentation “Best of the Web 2010” made by Richard Byme at ACTEM’s annual conference yesterday.  The presentation provides a great collection of many useful Web resources for teachers.

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The Web 2.0 applications hold profound potentials in education because of their open nature, ease of use and support for effective collaboration and communication. They change the traditional view of human knowledge and open up more opportunities in teaching and learning.  Today, many teachers are exploring the use of Web 2.0 tools into teaching and learning.  However, many researchers agree that studies of teachers’ perceptions and opinions are critical because teachers’ perceptions are significant to the implementation of technology innovations in teaching and learning.  About nine months ago, Patrivan Yuen and I conducted a study on teachers’ use and perceptions of Web 2.0 technologies in teaching and learning.  It was our hope that the findings of this study would provide useful information that enable administrators and teacher educators to better understand teachers’ use and perceptions of Web 2.0 technologies in teaching and learning. Consequently, a well focused course or training program for pre and in-service teachers integrating Web 2.0 technologies in education could be design, developed, and implemented.

Last week, I presented this study in a concurrent session at the 2010 SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) Conference in San Diego.  This presentation examines teachers’ use of Web 2.0 tools in education, assesses their awareness and perceptions of the pedagogical benefits of Web 2.0 technologies in teaching and learning, and investigates their interests and willingness of adopting Web 2.0 tools to support and supplement classroom instruction.  Below is our presentation.  Please feel free to provide any comments and suggestions.   Thanks.

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