Shelfari

 Shelfari

Shelfari is a book centered social network where members can catalog, tag, review, and discuss books. With Shelfari, you can create virtual bookshelves of books you have read, plan to read and currently own. Your bookshelf is literally a shelf that allows visitors to browse through your book collection. You can search for books by title, author, ISBN and subject, or import a text file from services like Delicious Library or LibraryThing. You can sign up for free and register an unlimited number of books.

Shelfari has a simple interface with some great features and the best of social networking, Also, Shelfari comes with a Shelfari widget with a sleek look and simple interface. The Shelfari widget works on most blogs and social networks, including Blogger, Typepad, Xanga, and Vox. I like Shelfari and think it is a great tool for teachers and librarians. They can use Shelfari to share books with their students and colleagues as well as post the new book collection in their library.

Advertisements

About Steve Yuen

I am a Professor Emeritus of Instructional Technology and Design at The University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, United States.
This entry was posted in Software Tools, Web 2.0 and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Shelfari

  1. Amanda says:

    Hi Dr. Yuen,

    This is Amanda from Shelfari. Just wanted to say thank you for including us on your blog. We’re really excited about the many ways our site allows readers, publishers, librarians, teachers, authors and other book-lovers to connect. This week we released a multiple book edit feature that allows you to organize up to 150 books at a time.

    Thanks,
    Amanda

  2. Tim Bryant says:

    Ok, this was right up my kid’s alley. I thought I loved to read when I was a kid, but nothing like my kids. They consume books for breakfast. I need to start a book fund and take donations because they are breaking me.

    Our regular first of the month trip (allowance time) includes a trip to Starbucks, and guess where else? The toy store? Music store? Walking around the mall? NO – Books-a-million is being supported by me, and me alone. I pay their rent for them through my children. Even with the members card, and the coupons I get e-mailed to me I am still going broke.
    Now, I give this website to my daughter and tell her to check it out for me so I can write a review of it. The only feedback I get is “This is awesome”, and now I can’t get her off the computer. So now I must investigate to find out if they are selling crack online or something, why is she stuck to the computer. Well, probably because this might as well be crack! My daughter is now hooked, and is finding books that she wouldn’t have found without the site. What was I thinking?

    Now my daughter is going to be e-mailing me her wish-list of books, and coming to me with more books I’ll have to check into (I’m careful about what I let her read). I’m not sure these folks have enough room on their server, my daughter is still not finished building her virtual “bookshelf”, and she’ll probably be busy for a few weeks getting that done. Now if she’s not reading books, she’ll be writing her reviews, or discussing books with her friends.

  3. Lou Ellen says:

    I have become totally obsessed with Shelfari. I LOVE it! I have created my own “Shelf,” and I have talked many of my friends into checking it out. My friends and family are always wary to try anything new online. They feel like it is too much work, or too weird. I just do not think they are comfortable enough with the Internet and communicating with people on a website. Personally, I love the interaction. Being able to see what other people are reading, or what they thought about certain books is great for me. I have little time to read books for fun these days, so I highly depend on the opinion of others on new books. I would hate to get a dud. ☺

    This would also be perfect for a book club. In the future, I would love to try this out for that purpose. Also, in education, this would be a fantastic site for kids to interact about certain books that are required in classes. This would be a great outlet for the kids to discuss the readings and help them write better book reports. Also, parents and teachers can monitor what they are doing, therefore keeping everyone informed in the process.

    I have a list of books I want to read on my computer already, and now I can just transfer them to my Shelfari account. It’s so much easier and much more convenient. I am also able to access and determine what books I want to read from anywhere – A big plus!! I will use this application a lot!

  4. Tim Bryant says:

    I decided to revisit Shelfari, it’s something I can do with my kids even though I don’t have a lot of time to read, I want to continue to encourage them to read and enjoy it. I keep promising myself that when I get done with school and a couple of certifications that I want to get, that I will start reading and writing again. It hasn’t happened so far, but Shelfari may be a good way to get back into it.

    I personally think all the kids in school should have to do something like this for school. The ones that don’t read might be “shamed” into it, I know that sounds bad but peer pressure can be a good thing if it’s directed the right way. The others that do read, or read just a little might be spurred on to compete with each other. Guys might read books that the girl they like has read so they can have something in common with her, and vice versa.

    I can tell you that as far as my kids go reading truly is the key to learning. When my son finally decided he enjoyed reading (We found some CSI books called “Traces”) he reads all the time now. We go a the first of the month (payday) to BAM and Starbucks. My kids might think about going by the video game store afterwards, but THEY want to go to BAM first, and it’s THEIR idea. My son has definitely improved in all aspects of school work, and the only major change was that he reads a lot more often now.

  5. Andrea Howard says:

    How cool! Like Tim, my 8-year old is a bookworm too. She loves books, upon books, and more books! Although I am a little leery about the idea of her using social networks, this one might just prove to be useful and gratifying to her. I love how you can keep up with you own “library”. Sometimes we read so many books and forget what we’ve read. This is great for for people who make reading recommendations and ideal for book clubs!

  6. Dane Conrad says:

    I had never heard of the Shelfari site until I read this post by Dr. Yuen. I immediately went to the site and setup an account to play around with it a bit before showing it to my 8-year-old daughter. I don’t think I will give her unlimited access to it but will look forward to using it WITH her. Like Tim Bryant’s post earlier, I always look for ways to encourage my daughter’s reading habit. She has recently discovered Nancy Drew books and also is participating in a reading competition at school dealing with Crown Award books. I hope that Shelfari offers her the opportunity to learn about other books along the same lines as the ones from the Crown Award list that she has read and loved. I remember I used to have to rely on the bookstore’s worker recommendations growing up and most of the time they were middle-aged ladies who weren’t reading the same things I was interested in at the time. This resulted in me purchasing some books that weren’t really that great.

    Now sure, Amazon and most other online book resellers currently have all sorts of mechanisms for customers to read other customer’s reviews, see what others purchased who bought a certain book, and email reminders about new releases. However, recent news has showed that some retailers “control” some of the displayed reviews weeding out ones that don’t match their goals. Using a service like Shelfari, keeps the peer-to-peer reviews closer to each other without the interference of a sales-focused filter.

  7. 郁茹 says:

    台灣因為發現這幾年來,學生的閱讀能力變差而推動閱讀,花了很多經費在買書,充實圖書館設備等,但是成效呢?仍是一個未知數,因為學生在使用網路的時間遠大於書籍閱讀的時間,所以看了Shelfari這個網站,有一個感想是,我們能不能也有一個像這樣的中文網站呢?我知道有幾家網路書店試著進行這樣的方式,但是參與者仍是以少數有錢買書的成人,屬於中小學生的還是比較少,而且功能上Shelfari提供了分享互動的地方,以哈利波特第七集來看,它放在年輕讀者區就有10萬多個讀者,600多則討論,這是很能引起學生閱讀的動機「別人都讀了,我也要讀」,「我也要讀完跟朋友上去討論」,我相信如此一來學生的閱讀一定可以提升。
    不過,我覺得既然目前沒有中文的網站,我覺得還是可以透過social networking的方式推動閱讀的,這會比學生每個人規定每年念幾本書來得有意義的。

  8. 郁茹 says:

    台灣因為發現這幾年來,學生的閱讀能力變差而推動閱讀,花了很多經費在買書,充實圖書館設備等,但是成效呢?仍是一個未知數,因為學生在使用網路的時間遠大於書籍閱讀的時間,所以看了Shelfari這個網站,有一個感想是,我們能不能也有一個像這樣的中文網站呢?我知道有幾家網路書店試著進行這樣的方式,但是參與者仍是以少數有錢買書的成人,屬於中小學生的還是比較少,而且功能上Shelfari提供了分享互動的地方,以哈利波特第七集來看,它放在年輕讀者區就有10萬多個讀者,600多則討論,這是很能引起學生閱讀的動機「別人都讀了,我也要讀」,「我也要讀完跟朋友上去討論」,我相信如此一來學生的閱讀一定可以提升。
    不過,我覺得既然目前沒有中文的網站,我覺得還是可以透過social networking的方式推動閱讀的,這會比學生每個人規定每年念幾本書來得有意義的。

  9. 奕嬛 says:

    Shelfari這個網站真的很不錯!我大致瀏覽了一下,發覺裡頭的組織架構真的很完整,可以從閱覽者or書名or評論者or群組各個方式去搜尋自身有興趣且相關的書籍,並同時能夠看到每個人的書櫃裡有哪些書籍&閱讀心得,這對於學生來說,確實是一大助益;你不用在他們背後催促著趕快去讀書,說著”書中自有黃金屋”這套老掉牙的說詞,尤其是在學生的心裡”同儕”影響力絕對比老師&家長在那邊苦口婆心還要強。可惜的是,對於學生而言,想要融入Shelfari必須要有一定水準的英文程度,才有較佳的接受度,不然就期待中文版的Shelfari上市吧!

  10. 奕嬛 says:

    Shelfari這個網站真的很不錯!我大致瀏覽了一下,發覺裡頭的組織架構真的很完整,可以從閱覽者or書名or評論者or群組各個方式去搜尋自身有興趣且相關的書籍,並同時能夠看到每個人的書櫃裡有哪些書籍&閱讀心得,這對於學生來說,確實是一大助益;你不用在他們背後催促著趕快去讀書,說著”書中自有黃金屋”這套老掉牙的說詞,尤其是在學生的心裡”同儕”影響力絕對比老師&家長在那邊苦口婆心還要強。可惜的是,對於學生而言,想要融入Shelfari必須要有一定水準的英文程度,才有較佳的接受度,不然就期待中文版的Shelfari上市吧!

  11. wendywen says:

    這裡提到的Shelfari介紹,我有去查詢一下知道Shelfari是一個個人的書籍管理系統,使用者可以在上面建立自己的書籍天地,只要在書架上一本一本加入你的書籍就可以了,蠻像個人書店或個人圖書館,還能把書的封面圖都放在上面真的看了很舒服,更想去翻閱書籍,我查詢了一下它還有很多的功能,有使用過的人都覺得Shelfari 的功能雖並不強大,但簡單精準,操作容易。但還是有缺點就是中文書沒有辦法找到,如果有中文的功能我覺得這真的很適合在台灣的學校中推動,這樣學生就能建立自己的書庫,也能和其他的人有閱讀上的分享互動,也能介紹自己的書籍系統,更能引起學生的閱讀興趣。

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s