Collective Intelligence and E-Learning 2.0: Implications of Web-Based Communities and Networking

I am pleased to announce the book, “Collective Intelligence and E-learning 2.0:  Implications of Web-Based Communities and Networking,” that I co-edited with Professor Harrison Hao Yang at the State University of New York at Oswego is published by IGI Global couple weeks ago.  The book is now available online at IGI GlobalAmazon.com, Target.com, and many online bookstores.

With the advent of Web 2.0, e-learning has the potential to become far more personal, social, and flexible. Collective Intelligence and E-Learning 2.0: Implications of Web-Based Communities and Networking provides a valuable reference to the latest advancements in the area of educational technology and e-learning. This innovative collection includes a selection of world-class chapters addressing current research, case studies, best practices, pedagogical approaches, and strategies related to e-learning resources and projects.

Preface

The Web is shifting from being a medium, in which information is transmitted and consumed, into being a platform, in which content is created, shared, remixed, repurposed, and exchanged. Learners become part of a global human network in which they can harness the collective intelligence of people in the world that could have never been possible previously. With the advent of Web 2.0, e-learning has the potential to become far more personal, social, and flexible. Consequently, e-learning 2.0 can capitalize on many sources of content aggregated together into learning experiences and utilize various tools including online references, courseware, knowledge management, collaboration, and search. Collective Intelligence and E-Learning 2.0: Implications of Web-Based Communities and Networking introduces theoretical aspect of e-learning 2.0 as well as disseminates cutting-edge research and first-hand practices regarding Game-Based Simulation, Podcasting, Second Life, Social Bookmarking, Social Networking, YouTube, Wiki, etc. on e-learning. In addition, instructional design models, strategies, and furture trends of e-learning are covered this book.

The book is written for broader audiences including educators, trainers, administrators, and researchers working in the area of e-learning or distance learning in various disciplines, e.g. educational fields, corporate training, instructional technology, computer science, library information science, information technology, and workforce development. The book can be used as a research reference, pedagogical guide, or educational resource in the area of Web 2.0 technologies and related applications applied to e-learning.

Organization of the Book

Collective Intelligence and E-Learning 2.0: Implications of Web-Based Communities and Networking is designed to be used in a flexible manner, and it can adapt easily to suit a variety of educational technology related courses and needs by students, instructors, and administrators. The book includes a selection of chapters addressing current research, case studies, best practices, pedagogical approaches and strategies, related resources and projects related to e-learning 2.0. The book is organized into two parts, From Web 2.0 to E-Learning 2.0 and Beyond (Chapters 1-6) and Web 2.0 Technologies in E-Learning (Chapters 7-16). The book covers beyond theoretical insights of Web 2.0 and e-learning 2.0. It shares practical aspects of e-learning 2.0 and provides readers with a balance of research, theory, and applications on both innovative Web 2.0 technologies and future e-learning.

Chapter 1: Learning Networks and Connective Knowledge. This chapter introduces theoretical views on factors impacting the future of e-learning. It discusses connectivisim theory, networked learning, connective knowledge, and network semantics that form a new e-learning approach (e-learning 2.0).

Chapter 2: Conceptualizing Codes of Conduct in Social Networking Communities. This chapter reviews the capabilities of social networking tools and links those capabilities to recent legal and ethical controversies involving use of social networking tools such as Facebook and MySpace.

Chapter 3: Fulfilling the Promise: Addressing Institutional Factors that Impede the Implementation of E-Learning 2.0. As online learning continues to expand and evolve, new challenges emerge regarding the implementation of Web 2.0 tools and technologies in online pedagogy. This chapter examines institutional factors that impede implementation of e-learning 2.0. The business model approach to online learning being embraced by many institutions may actually work against faculty who want to utilize Web 2.0 technologies to create E-Learning 2.0 experiences for their students.

Chapter 4: Designing Dynamic Learning Environment for Web 2.0 Application. This chapter presents a new instructional design model that specifically addresses the cognitive demands involved in Web 2.0 learning, promotes learning that focuses on metacognitive thinking and self-regulation, facilitates knowledge integration and construction of schemas-of-the-moment for ill-structured learning, and delivers a dynamic learning environment in Web 2.0 application.

Chapter 5: Instructional Strategies for Teaching in Synchronous Online Learning Environments (SOLE). This chapter discusses synchronous online learning environments (SOLEs) and their affordances for teaching and learning.

Chapter 6: University 2.0: Human, Social, and Societal Issues. Higher education is changing in important and profound ways. University 2.0 offers amazing potential to fundamentally change the way higher education functions in the future. This chapter describes many of the potential problems that will accompany University 2.0 and provides a series of recommended actions that university administrators can take to respond to the problems.

Chapter 7: Use of Wikis to Support Collaboration among Online Students. This chapter discusses the merits and challenges of using a wiki to support the activities of students during group projects.

Chapter 8: Wikibook Transformations and Disruptions: Looking Back Twenty Years to Today. A wikibook is a transformative and disruptive technology that is finding increasing use in schools and higher education institutions. This chapter describes the adoption of three wikibooks in cross-institutional higher education settings and discusses collaboration issues, technology issues, knowledge construction and sense of community issues related to the wikibook technology and the wikibook design process.

Chapter 9: Web-Based Video for e-Learning: Tapping into the YouTube Phenomenon. The recent explosive growth of Web-based video has expanded the repository of free content that can be tapped into for e-learning. This chapter introduces Web-based video as a new form of educational motion picture, delves into technical aspects of Web 2.0 video tools, describes instructional strategies that integrate Web-based video clips in e-learning, and examines barriers that could potentially inhibit its use.

Chapter 10: From Information Literacy to Scholarly Identity: Effective Pedagogical Strategies for Social Bookmarking. This chapter provides best examples for effective pedagogical applications of social bookmarking and offers insights into how these activities change the way students think and learn.

Chapter 11: VISOLE: A Constructivist Pedagogical Approach to Game-based Learning. VISOLE (Virtual Interactive Student-Oriented Learning Environment) is a constructivist pedagogical approach to empower computer game-based learning. This approach encompasses the creation of a near real-life online interactive world modeled upon a set of multi-disciplinary domains, in which each student plays a role in this “virtual world” and shapes its development. With sophisticated multi-player simulation contexts and teacher facilitation (scaffolding and debriefing), VISOLE provides opportunities for students to acquire both subject-specific knowledge and problem-solving skills through their near real-life gaming experience.

Chapter 12: Second Language E-Learning and Professional Training with Second Life® .This chapter addresses the application of e-learning in university degree programs based on exploiting the practical, intensive, and holistic aspects of Second Life®.

Chapter 13: Empirical evidence and practical cases for using virtual worlds in educational contexts. This chapter introduces three cases for educational uses of the Second Life® virtual world and provides empirical evidence for effective usage within the educational contexts.

Chapter 14: A Pedagogical Odyssey in Three-dimensional Virtual Worlds: The Second Life Model. This chapter discusses the theoretical perspectives, educational possibilities, as well as challenges of using virtual worlds in teaching and learning. In addition, it offers a pedagogical framework to support teaching and learning in virtual worlds – the Second Life® model.

Chapter 15: Podcasting – a flexible E-Learning Tool. This chapter discusses the uniqueness of podcasting technology in promoting e-learning, examines educational efficacy of podcasting in e-learning, and provides podcasting best practice in e-learning design and delivery.

Chapter 16: Using Social Networking to Enhance Sense of Community in E-Learning Courses. This chapter provides an overview and development of sense of community and social networking, discusses the potential uses of social networking in education, and presents a case study that integrates social networking into e-learning courses for the purpose of building a sense of community, improving communications and interactions, and promoting student-centered collaboration.

Chapter Authors and Table of Content

Table of Contents:

Foreword

George Siemens, University of Manitoba, Canada

Section I: From Web 2.0 to E-Learning 2.0 and Beyond

Chapter I: Learning Networks and Connective Knowledge

Stephen Downes, National Research Council, Canada

Chapter II: Conceptualizing Codes of Conduct in Social Networking Communities

Ann Dutton Ewbank, Arizona State University, USA
Adam G. Kay, Dartmouth College, USA
Teresa S. Foulger, Arizona State University, USA
Heather L. Carter, Arizona State University, USA

Chapter III: Fulfilling the Promise: Addressing Institutional Factors that Impede the Implementation of E-Learning 2.0

Judi Repman, Georgia Southern University, USA
Cordelia Zinskie, Georgia Southern University, USA
Elizabeth Downs, Georgia Southern University, USA

Chapter IV: Designing Dynamic Learning Environment for Web 2.0 Application

Robert Z. Zheng, University of Utah, USA

Chapter V: Instructional Strategies for Teaching in Synchronous Online Learning Environments (SOLE)

Marshall G. Jones, Winthrop University, USA
Stephen W. Harmon, Georgia State University, USA

Chapter VI: University 2.0: Human, Social, and Societal Issues

Daniel W. Surry, University of South Alabama, USA
David C. Ensminger, Loyola University Chicago, USA

Section II: Web 2.0 Technologies in E-Learning

Chapter VII: Use of Wikis to Support Collaboration among Online Students

Jay Alden, National Defense University, USA

Chapter VIII: Wikibook Transformations and Disruptions: Looking Back Twenty Years to Today

Curtis J. Bonk, Indiana University, USA
Mimi Miyoung Lee, University of Houston, USA
Nari Kim, The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, USA
Meng-Fen Grace Lin, University of Hawaii, USA

Chapter IX: Web-Based Video for e-Learning: Tapping into the YouTubeTM Phenomenon

Chareen Snelson, Boise State University, USA

Chapter X: From Information Literacy to Scholarly Identity: Effective Pedagogical Strategies for Social Bookmarking

Deborah Everhart, Georgetown University, USA
Kaye Shelton, Dallas Baptist University, USA

Chapter XI: VISOLE: A Constructivist Pedagogical Approach to Game-Based Learning

Morris S. Y. Jong, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Junjie Shang, Peking University, China
Fong-Lok Lee, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Jimmy H. M. Lee, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Chapter XII: Second Language E-Learning and Professional Training with Second Life®

Patricia Edwards, University of Extremadura, Spain
Mercedes Rico, University of Extremadura, Spain
Eva Dominguez, University of Extremadura, Spain
J. Enrique Agudo, University of Extremadura, Spain

Chapter XIII: Empirical Evidence and Practical Cases for Using Virtual Worlds in Educational Contexts

Hyung Sung Park, Korea National University of Education, South Korea
Young Kyun Baek, Korea National University of Education, South Korea

Chapter XIV: A Pedagogical Odyssey in Three-Dimensional Virtual Worlds: The SECOND LIFE® Model

Sharon Stoerger, Indiana University, USA

Chapter XV: Podcasting: A Flexible E-Learning Tool

Youmei Liu, University of Houston, USA
Shawn McCombs, University of Houston, USA

Chapter XVI: Using Social Networking to Enhance Sense of Community in E-Learning Courses

Steve Chi-Yin Yuen, The University of Southern Mississippi, USA
Harrison Hao Yang, State University of New York at Oswego, USA

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About Steve Yuen

I am a Professor Emeritus of Instructional Technology and Design at The University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, United States.
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3 Responses to Collective Intelligence and E-Learning 2.0: Implications of Web-Based Communities and Networking

  1. Donna Parker says:

    I’ve had the pleasure of using Dr. Yuen’s newly released book, Collective Intelligence and E-Learning 2.0: Implications of Web-Based Communities and Networking. This book serves as a guide and handbook for some of the latest Web-based technologies currently available and used. I’m really glad to see such an up-to-date book being offered. So many times I’ll start reading a book or an article of some sort and realize how outdated it has become. With technologies advancing at such a rapid pace, it’s very important that current information is being offered to students and instructors. Dr. Yuen’s Collective Intelligence and E-Learning 2.0: Implications of Web-Based Communities and Networking, is hot off of the press. This book offers information to a wide audience of various ages. Instructors can use it as an aid or as the classroom textbook so the students can also use it. The book has been divided into chapters that cover a specific Web 2.0 technology, making the table of contents your guide through the book. You don’t have to start at Chapter 1…you are free to skip around since the chapters do not build on each other. The various chapters are written by different authors pertaining to a specific subject matter. So if you want to review or brush up on social networking, you can easily find that information in Chapter 16 according to the table of contents. Each chapter includes easy-to-read information regarding specific tools, which makes it a very handy resource. Most of the chapters also cover the pedagogical values each tool can add to the educational arena.

  2. jennstyron says:

    Donna and me were fortunate enough to be in the same class which utilized Dr. Yang and Dr. Yuen’s book, Collective Intelligence and E-Learning 2.0: Implications of Web-Based Communities and Networking. The book has served as a great resource to enhancing our knowledge of Web 2.0 use within education, legal implications and considerations of Web 2.0 tools in education, and theoretical and pedagogical examples of effective integration into instruction and activities within the classroom.

    The course we are currently enrolled in is a two part course in which we learn about, work with, evaluate and reflect upon Web 2.0 technologies currently in place. This course utilizes about half of the book while next semester’s course will hit on the other areas not covered in this class.

    I have found most of the chapters to provide some useful information, obviously some chapters offering more insight than others (I think this will depend on your level of familiarity of the tools discussed). In addition, I like that the book is written by a wide range of academicians across the United States offering a diverse look at these technologies.

    This book would be a great resource for those working with or interested in how Web 2.0 tools can be integrated into classroom instruction.

  3. kemp says:

    I too, have used this book as a graduate student; however I believe it is versatile and will be useful for several different groups.

    Educators who are simply wishing to understand technology better will find this book useful. There is also enough mention of research and presentation of evidence based practices, that the instructor can intelligently lobby to implement some of the tools discussed in the book. The book provides enough information and sound pedagogy that one would be well-prepared to integrate technology into the classroom.

    Students will find the book interesting and useful as it is well-written, has numerous worthy references, and encourages further studies.

    Last, I believe anyone in the general public who simply wishes to understand technology better and apply it in their day-to-day life or business could learn from the book. It is not full of techno-jargon. Rather it provides useful, research based information, and is interesting to read.

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